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Thank goodness.

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mareino
18 hours ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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599 alumnae from Christine Blasey Ford’s high school sign letter saying they support her

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“Ford’s experience is all too consistent with stories we heard.”

Nearly 600 women from Christine Blasey Ford’s high school have signed on to an open letter saying that they support her and believe her account that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school.

“Dr. Blasey Ford’s experience is all too consistent with stories we heard and lived while attending Holton. Many of us are survivors ourselves,” the letter reads. First circulated by a group of women who do not know Ford and who graduated from Holton-Arms, a private all-girls school in Bethesda, Maryland, in 2005, the letter has 599 signatories from students who attended between 1962 and 2018.

Kate Gold, a class of 2005 Holton-Arms graduate who is an acupuncturist in Maryland, noted that the letter does not refer specifically to Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh but rather to the experiences of women more generally.

“A connection we all have is that in hearing her story, each and every one of us, resonated immediately, knowing that the situation she described could have happened to any one of us or our friends, and sometimes similar situations did,” Gold told Vox in an email.

She continued: “As far as Dr. Ford’s specific allegations, it is inconsequential/irrelevant to us whether anyone has heard them before, and in no way affects our belief that she is telling the truth. What we are referring to in our letter is the nearly ubiquitous experience of high school girls as they try to navigate coming of age in a society dominated by toxic masculinity.”

The letter reads in part:

We believe Dr. Blasey Ford and are grateful that she came forward to tell her story. It demands a thorough and independent investigation before the Senate can reasonably vote on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to a lifetime seat on the nation’s highest court...

Holton’s motto teaches students to “find a way or make one.” We dream of making a world where women are free from harassment, assault and sexual violence. We hold deep gratitude to Dr. Blasey Ford for bravely stepping forward and bringing us closer to that world we all seek.

Ford told the Washington Post that Kavanaugh held her down at a high school party in the 1980s and attempted to force himself on her, covering her mouth to quiet her protests. Her allegations were documented by her therapist in notes from sessions in 2012 and 2013 in which Ford talked about a “rape attempt” and being attacked by students “from an elitist boys’ school.” Kavanaugh denied the allegations, as did another male classmate who Ford said was involved in the incident.

The White House, so far, has stood by Kavanaugh, and Republican senators have continued to praise his character.

Senate Republicans have extended an invitation for both Ford and Kavanaugh to testify to the Senate Judiciary Committee next Monday, in either a public or private setting. Ford has not yet agreed to attend the hearing.

In light of the allegations, which first surfaced anonymously last week, 65 women who knew Kavanaugh in high school testified to his good character in a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee last Friday.

Those women, who mostly attended all-girls high schools around Kavanaugh’s alma mater Georgetown Prep, wrote: “For the entire time we have known Brett Kavanaugh, he has behaved honorably and treated women with respect. We strongly believe it is important to convey this information to the Committee at this time.”

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mareino
1 day ago
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How The Good Place’s D’Arcy Carden became Janet

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D’Arcy Carden gets to go to work with Ted Danson every day, which, honestly, sounds pretty great.

It involves a hotline for broken dolls.

One of my favorite things about one of my favorite shows — NBC’s daffily brilliant afterlife-set sitcom The Good Place — is that when actors auditioned for the series, they were not told who their characters were.

Instead, creator Mike Schur (previously of The Office and Parks and Recreation and Saturday Night Live, etc.) came up with seemingly normal characters who possessed some of the same qualities as the characters on the show, then wrote short sketches about them for the actors to perform as their audition.

The actors would come into the casting session, perform as characters who were almost but not quite the characters on The Good Place, and then hopefully book the job based on that.

So when D’Arcy Carden, who plays the metaphysical computer/robot/angel/demon/thing Janet on the series, joined me for the latest episode of my podcast, I Think You’re Interesting, I wanted to ask her about her experience with The Good Place’s audition process — and whether her long experience working in sketch comedy in the decade before she broke through with The Good Place helped her prepare for that audition.

Carden is one of my favorite performers on TV (in addition to The Good Place, she plays a smaller part on HBO’s wonderful hit-man comedy Barry), and I love the way she’s turned Janet into an out-and-out weirdo without sacrificing any of the character’s heart. That made her story of the audition process all the more interesting, and a selection from our conversation, lightly edited for length and clarity, follows.


Todd VanDerWerff

One of the things that’s part of Good Place lore is that when Mike [Schur] was first doing the show, he wrote character breakdowns that had nothing to do with the characters because for some reason, the creative team was trying to keep the premise of the show a secret. And then when NBC picked up the show, the network just immediately said what it was about, so that was all for naught. But do you remember what the breakdown was for who became Janet?

D’Arcy Carden

My audition? It was a helpful woman. I’m sure it said something along the lines of “a kind, helpful woman” who worked at a hotline for broken dolls. So you would call this woman and let her know, “My doll’s eye fell off,” and then she would come up with all these problem-solving suggestions. They were insane but different ways to fix the problem.

One was like, “My doll’s eye fell off,” and then one was something more drastic, and then the last one was, I think, her husband called, and their house was on fire or something like that. It was basically the same tone of, “Well, here’s how we can fix that.” But it didn’t say anything about robot anything. It didn’t say anything about the afterlife. It just was helpful, pleasant woman.

And what ended up being Janet in season one, especially the first few episodes, was pretty much exactly what the audition was. It just was like, “How can I help?!”

NBC’s ‘The Good Place’ FYC Screening And Q&A Leon Bennett/Getty Images
D’Arcy Carden appears at an Emmy FYC screening of The Good Place.

Todd VanDerWerff

Probably your background helped with that, because that’s basically a comedic sketch. That’s something Lily Tomlin might have done on Laugh-In. So tell me about approaching that audition.

D’Arcy Carden

It’s a funny one, because I am such a huge Mike Schur fan. I had never met him before. Also, Drew Goddard, another amazing writer-director-producer [who directed The Good Place’s pilot], I knew he was going to be in the audition. So basically it was two people that I was a huge fan of, [and] I knew this role could not be mine, for I was a lowly no one.

But I also was like, “This’ll be a great opportunity for me to show these guys what I got, or make them laugh. I’m going to make an impression so that in season four of this show that they’re making, they’ll cast me as, like, the lunch lady.”

So I did put a lot of work into the audition. And auditions are insane and stupid and horrible and weird and make no sense. Sometimes you connect with a character, and sometimes you don’t, and you just have to make it work. This was a character where, like, “Ooh, I totally know who this person is!” And it almost felt easy. Like I said, a lot of times that isn’t the case. Sometimes you’re really struggling to just, like, fake-act, which is just the grossest feeling on earth, but this one just felt almost easy.

The first audition was so fun and pleasant, and Mike and Drew were so great, and so was Allison Jones, the casting director. It was such a great, easy, comfortable, fun room that when I left the room, almost my head was spinning like, “I know I didn’t get it, but damn, that felt so good.” And then I got a callback, and it was a very similar vibe in the room — easy to talk to the people in the room.

I kept having these experiences with these auditions, where it was like, “There’s no way I’m getting this. I know that. That’s not happening. But that felt great.” And it just kept going like that until I finally got this 11 pm phone call after waiting for a month to hear about it, while I was watching Fargo season two, which means I was watching Ted Danson and falling more in love with him with every episode.

Todd VanDerWerff

There’s a power in thinking you’re not going to get it.

D’Arcy Carden

I think so too. It’s, like, confidence, a weird sort of messed-up confidence, because you’re a little bit like, “I have nothing to lose,” and a little bit like there’s no desperation. And I think desperation is a total audition killer. But actors, we’re desperate for jobs.

So that’s what I mean by auditions are just cuckoo. You go in and you do it one time, and in no acting situation is that [normal]. If you’re in a play, you’re rehearsing for months. If you’re on set, you’re doing take after take. I’m not suggesting there’s a better way to do it, really. Any other way would be so time-consuming, but auditions just feel kooky.


For much more with Carden, including her thoughts on how to play a non-human character (and other actors she thinks have done a great job at exactly that), listen to the full episode, which also includes a discussion with another of my favorite TV scene stealers, Natasha Rothwell, who plays Kelli on HBO’s Insecure.

To hear interviews with more fascinating people from the world of arts and culture — from powerful showrunners to web series creators to documentary filmmakers — check out the I Think You’re Interesting archives.

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satadru
1 day ago
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Love this show...
New York, NY
mareino
2 days ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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Address Me

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Follow @lamebook on instagram for more content!

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mareino
2 days ago
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USDA approves shipping slaughtered chicken to China and back, says you can eat it

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If you've ever seen what a poultry farm looks like you would not believe chicken that has been slaughtered, frozen, shipped to China for processing, and then shipped back to the US to be sold to consumers was still edible.

I can believe it is cheap, or no one would have thought to put other people at risk to make it happen.

Real Farmacy:

“Chinese chicken” will soon have a whole new meaning, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently gave the green-light to four chicken processing plants in China, allowing chicken raised and slaughtered in the U.S. to be exported to China for processing, and then shipped back to the U.S. and sold on grocery shelves here. Furthermore, the imported processed poultry will not require a country-of-origin label nor will U.S. inspectors be on site at processing plants in China before it is shipped to the United States for human consumption.

Food safety experts worry about the quality of chicken processed in a country notorious for avian influenza and food-borne illnesses. And they predict that China will eventually seek to broaden the export rules to allow chickens born and raised in China.

“Economically, it doesn’t make much sense,” said Tom Super, spokesman for the National Chicken Council, in a recent interview with the Houston Chronicle. “Think about it: A Chinese company would have to purchase frozen chicken in the U.S., pay to ship it 7,000 miles, unload it, transport it to a processing plant, unpack it, cut it up, process/cook it, freeze it, repack it, transport it back to a port, then ship it another 7,000 miles. I don’t know how anyone could make a profit doing that.”

Bureau of Labor Statistics data estimates that American poultry processors are paid roughly $11 per hour on average. In China, reports have circulated that the country’s chicken workers can earn significantly less—$1 to 2 per hour—which casts doubt on Super’s economic feasibility assessment.

I know the video is about cattle. LAUGH, ok?!

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satadru
4 days ago
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Quality Fade + Cheap Chicken sounds like a win-win situation for China! Can we start getting a "Not made or processed in China" labelling movement going?
New York, NY
dreadhead
3 days ago
Quality etc aside how it is sad that this is something that is even being considered. Such a waste of resources to probably save a few pennies on the dollar.
mareino
3 days ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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1 public comment
JimB
4 days ago
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Madness

football champions twitter.com/BryanDFischer/…

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This whole play is… something. pic.twitter.com/SEL5OGNdN4


Posted by BryanDFischer on Sunday, September 16th, 2018 4:44am


1778 likes, 446 retweets

Posted by jon_bois on Sunday, September 16th, 2018 4:56am


1041 likes, 112 retweets
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mareino
4 days ago
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So much oh no in one play
Washington, District of Columbia
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