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Counterfeit airbags are becoming alarmingly more common

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Counterfeit airbags are becoming alarmingly more common originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 24 Jun 2024 11:25:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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mareino
7 hours ago
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A nation can invest a little bit up front in fraud prevention, or a whole lot in remediation
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freeAgent
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If Opiates Are Killing Americans, Why Won't the FDA Let Us Try an Alternative?

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Penthrox | Illustration: Lex Villena; St John

For more than a decade, patients who've needed certain controlled medications have suffered from ill-advised, untenable policies the U.S. government has instituted, allegedly to mitigate the ever-surging numbers of drug overdose deaths. These policies have been a dismal failure on multiple fronts: Not only have deaths continued to surge, but the terrifying intrusion of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) into the practice of medicine has had a chilling effect on patients and their physicians. 

As the DEA relentlessly tightens production quotas on medications for pain and ADHD, it has begun tracking every pill, making doctors increasingly reluctant to prescribe any controlled drugs and leaving many patients in a lurch. Perhaps worse, DEA production quotas have caused the back-order of multiple drugs—an increasingly common burden for patients, even those fortunate to have doctors willing to risk a DEA drug bust for simply doing their job.

The ill and disabled suffer the most. Virtually all patients who have diseases or chronic pain conditions will say that the emergency department is the single worst place to go for relief from severe pain. Doctors and hospitals are often more concerned about law enforcement looking over their shoulders than patient care. Patients desperate for pain relief often turn to street drugs, where they fall victim to counterfeit pills that contain fentanyl (or worse) instead of a legal opioid. 

By contrast, doctors in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and throughout Europe have been using a fixed-dose, inhaled general anesthesia medicine that effectively reduces acute pain—a medication denied to Americans by a seemingly indifferent Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 

Doctors commonly used methoxyflurane (Penthrane) as a general anesthetic in the 1960s and 1970s. But, because it had toxic effects on the liver and kidneys, anesthesiologists gradually stopped using it and turned to safer anesthetics. In 2005, the FDA removed methoxyflurane from the market.

However, an Australian company, Medical Developments International, has been marketing a lower-dose, self-administered, single-use nasal inhaler version of methoxyflurane for 30 years. Its brand name is Penthrox, though many people refer to it as the "green whistle," because of the package it comes in. People living in Europe have had access to the green whistle since 2015, and Canadian patients have had it since 2018. 

In 2020, a randomized controlled clinical trial in the U.K. demonstrated that the drug saved an average of 71 minutes in providing pain relief to accident and emergency department patients. Likewise, a 2020 Australian trial found that a methoxyflurane inhaler "was associated with clinically significant lower pain scores compared to standard therapy." While it may cause drowsiness in some people, methoxyflurane at this low dose has few adverse effects, such as liver and kidney toxicity, and there are no reported cases of addiction or abuse

In 2022, the FDA finally lifted its "clinical hold" on methoxyflurane nasal inhalers and has allowed its manufacturer to resume FDA-supervised clinical trials. Unfortunately, this is an unnecessary waste of time.

This is hardly the first time the FDA has been behind the times, blocking Americans from accessing medications that are readily available in other advanced countries. People in Europe were able to purchase nonsedating antihistamines like Claritin over the counter (OTC) in the 1990s, but the FDA didn't permit Americans to do this until 2002, instead forcing them to use more dangerous sedating OTC antihistamines, such as Benadryl. 

It took 12 years and 4 months (beginning in 2001) for the FDA to finally give women the freedom to buy the emergency contraceptive Plan B over the counter, while during this same time, women in the U.K., Canada, and countries in Europe already had OTC access to the drug. And while women in over 100 other countries can get birth control without a prescription, American women still have to get a prescription for all but one.

Australians have been free to purchase the opioid overdose antidote naloxone OTC since 2016, and Italians have had it available to them since 1996. It wasn't until 2023 that the FDA allowed Americans to buy the drug without a prescription and only in its nasal spray form

Now, while Americans are having more and more difficulty getting access to pain-relieving opioids, the FDA forces them to wait for an alternative to opioids that people in much of the developed world have been using for years.

One way lawmakers can bypass the FDA's long and arduous approval process is through a reform called international reciprocityallowing American doctors and patients access to drugs and medical devices approved by regulatory agencies in similar countries. Labels on such products should plainly state "Not FDA-approved" but should state which country's agency has approved them. 

Reciprocal approval already exists among the European Union states plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway. There is no logical reason that Americans shouldn't be able to access products approved in countries such as Canada, France, England, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand, and Israel.

If Congress enacted reciprocity, Americans in pain would be able to get relief from methoxyflurane while the FDA deliberates. This common-sense action has enormous potential upside and little to no downside. Congress should act without delay.

The post If Opiates Are Killing Americans, Why Won't the FDA Let Us Try an Alternative? appeared first on Reason.com.

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mareino
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Amazon Says It Will Stop Using Plastic Pillows in Shipments

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They’ll be replaced in North America with paper packing, eliminating some 15 billion pillows a year. Plastic film is a major pollutant.

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mareino
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fuckin' FINALLY. next up: giving warehouse workers break time
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Watermelons

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Today, updates on degrowther environmentalists, SO2 stratospheric injection, salt injection, solar, nuclear, electrification, iron fertilization, and more.


Watermelons:

  • Big, strong, and unabashedly green on the outside

  • Very red on the inside, with little substance

  • Seeds of black in their heart

Exhibit A: Golden Rice

Normal rice vs vitamin A-enriched golden rice

Vitamin A deficiency kills over 100,000 children every year and leaves over 100,000 more blind. Golden Rice has additional vitamin A and eliminates that problem, saving countless lives and improving many more.

GREENPEACE: Anything genetically modified is bad, therefore it's impossible to prove golden rice is fully safe, therefore it should be banned.

100 NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS: There’s plenty of safety evidence from countries like the US, Canada, and New Zealand. It’s just like rice, except with more Vitamin A. It would be a crime against humanity to stop it. 

I’m a watermelon. Who do I side with? Greenpeace, of course! Because genetically-modified organisms are always bad—even in the face of saving millions of children. In fact, now that I think about it, having a few million fewer people might have its silver lining…

In fact, I’d be happy if we had another pandemic. Hopefully, this one would kill a ton of people. THAT would really solve the “environment problem” (ie, humans).

Exhibit B: More Pandemics Please

Exhibit C: More Fossil Fuels Please

Would I want a new Tesla Gigafactory that can replace all these polluting internal combustion cars with clean electric ones? No!

Watermelons storming Tesla's new Gigafactory near Berlin on May 10th:

Why? Because Elon Musk is a rich capitalist, and that’s what matters!

"The fight against this car factory is a fight against every car factory. So that the earth remains our home in the long term, we should be brave enough to creatively redesign this factory. Whether we build buses, ambulances or cargo bikes here is a decision we must make together."Watermelon group "Disrupt".

A picture showing the true beliefs of Watermelons, fixated on making the Earth a more environmentally-friendly place. On the surface, they were also combatting some deforestation to make space for the factory, and use of groundwater. Source.

Exhibit D: More Land for Solar, Wind, and Protected Wildlife Is Bad

Would I want a deal to connect 160 solar and wind energy projects to the grid, to decarbonize the economy, and in the process double the area dedicated to wildlife?

No, because what if some wildlife is impacted? 

"We have a lot of unique features, species, and habitats here.”— Jennifer Filipiak, executive director of the Driftless Area Land Conservancy.

Although when you look into the details…

“After the transmission towers are constructed, there is minimal impact at that point.”—David Drake, wildlife specialist at the University of Wisconsin.

Doesn’t matter. Humans can’t change anything in nature for progress, be it for human flourishing or even nature flourishing. We should just not touch anything and let nature take over, whatever that means.

​​Capitalism means rapid mass extinction via biodiversity annihilation. Corporations have locked in the destruction of the planet as we knew it.Ben See

Exhibit E: Let Sequoias Go Extinct

Would I want to replant a burned sequoia grove, so that the endangered trees that take centuries to grow back have a better chance? 

No, because:

“Wilderness is for natural processes and natural succession. It’s not supposed to be a managed landscape for tree plantations.”—Chad Hanson, research ecologist and director of the John Muir Project.

Humans should just not touch anything.

Exhibit F: Again, Don’t Produce Electric Vehicles, Dammit!

One of our favorite ways to win in the US is simply to bury our enemies under tons of paperwork, thanks to Environmental Protection Agency bureaucracy. But since we have black seeds at our heart, and the green is only skin deep, we love attacking green projects.

EV: Electric Vehicle

In fact, we prefer to attack green projects. 

Exhibit G: Let’s Attack Renewables More

EIS: Environment Impact Statements

Unfortunately, the government is waking up to our shenanigans and is limiting our ability to impact transmission and solar projects. Ugh.

Exhibit H: The Desert Tortoise Needs More Desert

Exhibit I: Thanos Is Popular on Earth

This is from Paul Ehrlich’s book The Population Bomb, which was published decades ago and formed generations of environmentalists:

According to him, the problem is just that there are too many people. He might have added: “of the dirty kind, of course. Not the well civilized people.”

I’ve been studying the history of Degrowth and it’s mired with racism like this, and avoids the much more obvious issue: Ehrlich wasn’t disgusted because there were too many Indians. He was disgusted because they were too poor. The answer is more wealth and technology, not fewer people.

Exhibit J: German Greens

I have already bashed them a lot here, claiming among other things that the closure of nuclear reactors was a stupid mistake that was costly, bad for the environment, and good for Putin. A new paper quantifies that: Keeping and expanding nuclear power would have:

  • Cut Germany’s CO2 emissions by 73% compared to today

  • For half the cost (or about €350B less!)

The Anti-Watermelon Reaction

This is just a small sample. If you have more examples, please share them! In the meantime, it looks like Europeans in general, and Germans in particular, are fed up with this.

Source: Me with data from Wikipedia

Unfortunately, it’s unclear that the Watermelons will get the right takeaway:

This is typical, by the way: Movements radicalize as they are proven wrong, because the more reasonable people leave, leaving only the more radical, less rational, people.

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As you know, I think technology will solve climate change in particular and environmental issues in general, so environmentalists who block technological development are doubly evil, since they destroy both the economy and the environment, while posing as saviors.

So how is technology going to solve climate change?

Technology for Energy and Climate Change Update

Make Sunsets

According to their newsletter, you are smart and visionary:

NPR and ABC aired in-depth pieces focused on Make Sunsets this month; we have made it into the general public discourse.

Tomas' posts led to over 10x more purchases than NPR and ABC combined. Counterintuitive to us at first, but makes sense on closer examination: we're early. New things get popular niche, then sell niche, then get mainstream notice if they're Really Lucky and Somewhat Talented. That is where we are at; with particularly smart and visionary customers, of course;) 

Here’s the impact you’re having:

In a few years, when sulfate injection becomes widespread and we stop global warming to buy ourselves some time, you will legitimately be able to say: I was ahead of the curve on this one, and thanks to people like me, we were able to push this into human consciousness.

Good job!

Have we learned anything about SO2 in the meantime? Yes.

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mareino
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How Capitalism Went Off the Rails

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Easy money destroyed the basis for productive, competitive markets.
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mareino
4 days ago
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> Nowhere has inflation (in the broad sense of the term) been more evident than in global financial markets. In 1980 they were worth a total of $12 trillion — equal to the size of the global economy at the time. After the pandemic, Sharma noted, those markets were worth $390 trillion, or around four times the world’s total gross domestic product.
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if you don’t do anything else today,

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uncleromeo:

if you don’t do anything else today,

Please have a moment of silence for the people who were killed instead of freed when news of emancipation finally reached the furthest corners of the american south.

have another moment for the ledgers, catalogs, and records that were burned and the homes that were destroyed to hide the presence of very much alive and still enslaved people on dozens of plantations and homesteads across the south for decades after emancipation.

and have a third moment for those who were hunted and killed while fleeing the south to find safety across the border, overseas, in the north and to the west.

black people. light a candle, write a note to those who have passed telling them what you have achieved in spite of the racist and intolerant conditions of this world, feel the warmth of the flame under your hand, say a prayer of rememberance if you are religious, place the note under the candle, and then blow it out.

if you have children, sit them down and tell them anything you know about the life of oldest black person you’ve ever met. it doesn’t have to be your own family. tell them what you know about what life was like for us in the days, years, decades after emancipation. if you don’t know much, look it up and learn about it together.

This is Juneteenth.

white people CAN interact with this post. share it, spread it.

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mareino
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hannahdraper
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